Standard 2: Topics and PD Guides

Component/Topic 2.1 Learners apply their knowledge of family-centered practices, family systems theory, and the changing needs and priorities in families’ lives to develop trusting, respectful, affirming, and culturally responsive partnerships with all families that allow for the mutual exchange of knowledge and information.

What Learners Should Know and Be Able to Do

Learners who have mastered this component/topic understand how to apply family-centered practices to work with young children and their families. They use relational practices to foster trusting partnerships with families, including acknowledging child and family strengths as well as nurturing positive interactions by listening actively, showing empathy, and respecting family perspectives. They use participatory practices to cultivate collaboration, including soliciting families’ opinions and ideas, jointly sharing information for family choice making, and meaningfully involving families in identifying and obtaining the resources they need. Learners seek a greater understanding of families’ diverse knowledge and expertise (e.g., funds of knowledge) about their children’s strengths and needs. Learners support families by acting in ways that build on family strengths and capacities in working with their young children. For example, for infants and toddlers, candidates and families jointly identify and implement individualized plans and supports around the family’s priorities that promote the child’s engagement, learning, development, and well-being (e.g., accessing natural environments and inclusive settings within the community). Together with families, candidates may identify strategies to facilitate the child’s development.

Learners understand family systems theory and recognize that biological, environmental, cultural, and societal factors influence families’ structure, interactions, functions, and the family life cycle. They systematically gather information to develop a deeper understanding of families, their uniqueness, circumstances, and changing priorities. They consider factors such as social identities (e.g., culture, gender, sexuality, socio-economic status, marital status, and age) as well as stressors such as trauma, mental health issues, and medical conditions, as they build relationships, exchange knowledge and information, and plan for individualized supports. For example, candidates ensure that all aspects of the classroom environment, including the activities and materials, reflect the diversity of the children and families represented in the program. They modify services/supports or use technology when appropriate based on the family’s/child’s needs (e.g., adjusting meeting times to accommodate families’ work schedules). They also understand and respect the role of each family member as it relates to their preferred engagement in planning and implementing individualized supports. Learners engage in self-reflection of their own culture, beliefs, and experiences, and evaluate the impact it has on their partnerships with families. They use the knowledge gained through reflection to inform interactions with families and respond in sensitive and culturally affirming ways. For example, they recognize both strengths and barriers, respect home cultures and languages, and honor parenting styles and family values (e.g., candidates provide information regarding child progress in home language).

Component/Topic 2.2 Learners communicate clear, comprehensive, and objective information about resources and supports that help families to make informed decisions and advocate for access, participation, and equity in natural and inclusive environments.

    What Learners Should Know and Be Able to Do

    Learners who have mastered this component/topic use effective communication strategies, such as attending, listening, and asking clarifying questions, to actively seek information from and about families. They articulate unbiased, comprehensive, and clear information from multiple perspectives and varied sources. Sources of information may include other professionals, policies, research, and professional literature. Candidates communicate in families’ preferred modes, utilizing multiple formats, using technology when appropriate, and regularly checking for understanding (e.g., inserting intentional breaks during conversations, using interpreters) during formal and informal processes such as individualized education planning, home visits, and parent-teacher conferences. They prepare families to make informed decisions that are reflective of their priorities and concerns and support their young child’s engagement, learning, development, and well-being. For example, they identify and connect families to resources (e.g., mental health services, health care, adult education, English language instruction, and economic support/assistance), and may help with planning transitions from one setting to another.

    Learners recognize the critical need for equitable access to supports within natural and inclusive environments for all young children and families. They use a range of strategies to support families in advocating for access and equity in natural environments and inclusive settings and share information about all available services and community resources. They reflect on their own biases in order to understand the impact they have on their communication with families. They collaboratively problem solve and plan around the vision families have for their children and identify strategies to support families in accessing local community settings. They ensure multiple opportunities for families to be engaged in program activities and governance, including using strategies to seek family perspectives on program offerings. For example, they establish opportunities for families to connect with one another and respect families’ decisions.

    Component/Topic 2.3 Learners engage families in identifying their strengths, priorities, and concerns; support families to achieve the goals they have for their family and their young child’s development and learning; and promote families’ competence and confidence during assessment, individualized planning, intervention, instruction, and transition processes.

      What Learners Should Know and Be Able to Do

      Learners who have mastered this component/topic recognize family engagement as essential in supporting and strengthening family capacity and well-being to promote child development and learning and in the provision of high quality, effective supports for young children and their families. They promote families as equal team members using participatory practices such as acknowledging their expertise and supporting them in identifying strengths, priorities, and concerns. 

      Learners ensure multiple opportunities for active family collaboration in decision-making during assessment, planning, implementation, and transition processes. During assessment, they work in partnership with families to exchange knowledge, information, and expertise and to evaluate and synthesize information about the child’s strengths and needs. They collaboratively create outcomes/goals, develop implementation plans, and identify the formal and informal supports and services necessary to achieve the outcomes/goals. They use evidence-based practices that are rooted within a culturally responsive framework to select and adapt learning strategies appropriate to each family. Learners remain non-judgmental in their interactions and offer support aligned with identified strengths, priorities, and needs of   children and families. 

      Learners support families in taking actions that meet their own and their child’s needs.  They frequently communicate and reflect with families to evaluate, monitor, and modify services, supports, and resources. They use a range of intervention and instructional strategies to promote families’ competence and confidence (e.g., video, coaching, consultation, modeling, assistive technology). They employ adult learning strategies when partnering with families across environments, activities, and programs. Learners ensure that information and knowledge shared are understandable, immediately useful, and relevant to the family and build on prior knowledge. In preparation for and during transitions, they seek family input and provide unbiased information on a range of available supports, services, and resources (e.g., home, community, and/or school settings). They support families in evaluating transition options and making decisions to meet identified needs and priorities. 

      What Learners Should Know and Be Able to Do

      Learners who have mastered this component/topic use effective communication strategies, such as attending, listening, and asking clarifying questions, to actively seek information from and about families. They articulate unbiased, comprehensive, and clear information from multiple perspectives and varied sources. Sources of information may include other professionals, policies, research, and professional literature. Candidates communicate in families’ preferred modes, utilizing multiple formats, using technology when appropriate, and regularly checking for understanding (e.g., inserting intentional breaks during conversations, using interpreters) during formal and informal processes such as individualized education planning, home visits, and parent-teacher conferences. They prepare families to make informed decisions that are reflective of their priorities and concerns and support their young child’s engagement, learning, development, and well-being. For example, they identify and connect families to resources (e.g., mental health services, health care, adult education, English language instruction, and economic support/assistance), and may help with planning transitions from one setting to another.

      Learners recognize the critical need for equitable access to supports within natural and inclusive environments for all young children and families. They use a range of strategies to support families in advocating for access and equity in natural environments and inclusive settings and share information about all available services and community resources. They reflect on their own biases in order to understand the impact they have on their communication with families. They collaboratively problem solve and plan around the vision families have for their children and identify strategies to support families in accessing local community settings. They ensure multiple opportunities for families to be engaged in program activities and governance, including using strategies to seek family perspectives on program offerings. For example, they establish opportunities for families to connect with one another and respect families’ decisions.

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      Activity Bank

      *New* Tip sheet: Enhancing Family-Provider Partnerships During COVID-19  Enhancing Family-Provider Partnerships
      Tips for Providers: Providing & Coordinating EI Remotely Tips for Providers: What to say to Families
      Tips for Providers: Providing & Coordinating EI Remotely (What will it look like?) Tips for Providers: What will a Remote Visit Look Like?
      Tips for Families: Receiving Remote EI Services Tips for Families Flyer .pdf What is Remote EI

      Consejos para Familias .pdf What is Remote EI? (Spanish)

      Tips for Families: How to prepare for a Remote EI Visit Tips for Families: .pdf Preparing for the Visit

      TConsejos para Familias: .pdf Preparing for the Visit (Spanish)

      ECPC Course Enhancement Modules E-Learning Lessons, Practice Guides & Resources 
      CONNECT Modules CONNECT Modules and Courses
      Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center Framework for reflective questioning / The Coaching Quick Reference Guide - .pdf
      Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center Tools of Trade
      OCALI (Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence Disabilities) (note: you must login but it is free) Suite of Resources for Early Childhood Professionals
      Public Consulting Group Use of telehealth in early intervention (IDEA Part C)
      Protecting Student Privacy

      U.S. Department of Education

      Student Privacy 101

      FERPA and the Coronavirus Disease 2019

      FERPA and Virtual Learning

      Edelman, L. (2020). Planning for the Use of Video Conferencing for Early Intervention Home Visits during the COVID-19 Pandemic Planning for the Use of Video Conferencing for Early Intervention Home Visits during the COVID-19 Pandemic
      CEC Hosted Webinar with Resources Teaching Special Education Online During COVID-19
      National Center for Hearing Assessment & Management Utah State University Welcome to the Tele-Intervention Learning Courses
      Lisa Dieker & Rebecca Hines UCF - Podcasts for Part B/619 Coordinators Series of Podcasts: teaching online, inclusion, etc.
      National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations - May Newsletter Pyramid in the Time of COVID-19