Teaming

Course Enhancement Modules are designed to be used by higher education faculty and professional development providers to support learning at the pre-service and in-service levels. 

The curriculum enhancement modules are designed for flexible use.

Each curriculum enhancement module includes:

  • ​Anchor presentation(s) with speaker notes and activities which can be used in their entirety or adapted.
  • Each presentation includes references and additional related resources.
  • Sample syllabi.

Powerpoint Presentations:

This sample syllabus provides ideas for resources, activities, readings, and assignments, aligned with the EI/ECSE standards.  Consider state and university policies and add them as appropriate.  This is a sample only and is not a complete syllabus.

What Learners Should Know and Be Able to Do

Learners Who Have Mastered this Component/Topic Know and Understand:

  • Legal requirements for teams and teaming,
  • Teaming models,
  • Teaming skills and processes, including uses of technology, and
  • The skills, expertise, and roles of team members include professionals from other disciplines, paraprofessionals, and family members.

Learners Who Have Mastered this Component/Topic Are Able To:

Apply teaming models, such as:

  • Primary service provider,
  • Transdisciplinary,
  • Interdisciplinary, and
  • Multidisciplinary

Apply teaming skills and processes, such as:

  • Uses of technology,
  • Problem-solving,
  • Conflict resolution,
  • Joint decision-making,
  • Role release,
  • Group facilitation, and
  • Communication.

Participate in and lead team meetings.

Collaborate and communicate with families, other professionals, and paraprofessionals.

Multimedia Illustrations

This section includes short videos, video vignettes, TED Talks, and webinars that relate to the topic. The majority addresses the evidence-based practice for adult learners of illustration.  Some are informational and relate to the practice of introduction.

Component and Title Key Content Duration Link
3.1 Active Listening: No Concerns In this video from CDC's early educator training tool, Watch Me! Celebrating Milestones and Sharing Concerns, a mom and early educator discuss a child who is meeting all of his age-appropriate developmental milestones. 3:00 View
3.1 CONNECT Video 3.1: The Teacher’s Viewpoint Shawanda, a teacher in a community-based childcare program shares a dilemma about collaborating with a speech therapist to address the learning goals of David, a 4-year-old boy in her class. 1:50 View
3.1 CONNECT Video 3.2: The Therapist’s Viewpoint Ashley, a speech therapist shares her view on collaborating with a teacher in a community-based childcare program to address the goals of David, a 4-year-old boy with language delays. 1:09 View
3.1 CONNECT Video 3.3: Conversation with Examples of Attending and Active Listening Andi, a Head Start teacher, and LeeMarie, a speech therapist, have a conversation about collaborating to address the learning goals of a 4-year-old child in Andi’s classroom. This is part one of a three-part conversation highlighting examples of attending and active listening communication strategies. 2:38 View
3.1 CONNECT Video 3.4: Conversation with Examples of Seeking and Verifying Information Andi, a Head Start teacher, and LeeMarie, a speech therapist, have a conversation about collaborating to address the learning goals of a 4-year-old child in Andi’s classroom. This is part two of a three-part conversation highlighting examples of seeking and verifying communication strategies. 2:39 View
3.1 CONNECT Video 3.5: Conversation with Examples of Joining and Supporting Andi, a Head Start teacher, and LeeMarie, a speech therapist, have a conversation about collaborating to address the learning goals of a 4-year-old child in Andi’s classroom. This is part three of a three-part conversation highlighting examples of joining and supporting communication strategies. 3:13 View
3.1 CONNECT Video 2.3: Highlights of a Home Visit The preschool teacher makes a home visit before the child starts preschool to build rapport with the mom, gather information, and share information about what the first day of school will be like. 3:03 View
3.1 Five Ways to Muck Up a Go-Around (in meetings) Go-arounds are an excellent strategy to ensure that everyone on the team provides an idea, information, etc. This video provides five things that may occur during a go-around to cause the strategy to be ineffective and then, presents alternative strategies. 8:08 View
3.1 Improve Your Listening Skills with Active Listening This video discusses five active listening techniques. 2:39 View
3.1 Janella’s Story The video illustrates how an Early Interventionist worked with members of a transdisciplinary team and the family to help 27-month-old Janella make her choices known and participate in play and family routines. 11:33 View
3.1 Use of Technology with Evidence-Based Early Intervention This video provides an overview of how video conferencing can be used to conduct team early intervention meetings that include both professionals and families. 6:54 View
3.1 Using Facetime to Enhance Team Collaboration Kate, a physical therapist, and Lori, a developmental specialist, illustrate how video conferencing is being used to help practitioners who work in different locations better collaborate to support families. 4:50 View
3.1 Using Video and Video Conferencing to Enable Team Meetings over Distances This video illustrates several ways that video and video conferencing are being used to enhance support for families and team functioning. 6:35 View
3.1 Teamwork: The Path to Success This video of a female rowing team emphasizes that reaching a common goal requires having that sense of trust and relying on others. There must be constant communication, otherwise, you're set up to fail. It happens through a ridiculous amount of hard work, and the right team. It's essential to share knowledge; it's how people view what their goals are and how they can achieve them. 1:19 View
3.1 Teamwork with a Cause This excerpt from the movie, Here Comes the Boom, stresses that when one member of a team is not contributing to the team, the entire team begins to stagnate with the potential for the entire team to become dysfunctional. If one team member makes the effort to get back on track, it can energize the entire team. 3:12 View
3.1 Technique (for meetings): 9 Ways to Check for Agreement This video identifies nine strategies for selecting a solution or option among several that the team generates when a decision is needed. 6:19 View
3.1 Technique (for meetings): The 5 Second Rule This video stresses the importance of waiting 5 seconds when asking a question or providing a discussion prompt during meetings to facilitate team participation. 3:02 View
3.1 The Power of Collaboration: Dr. Shelle VanEtten de Sanchez at TEDxABQWomen In this TEDx Talk, Dr. Shelle VanEtten de Sanchez, Director of Education at the National Hispanic Cultural Center, discusses the power of collaboration in situations of limited fiscal resources, staffing, and time. In an engaging manner, she defines collaboration, discusses what can happen through collaboration, and identifies five essential lessons for collaboration. 6:29 View
3.1 TMB Panyee FC Short Film This video tells the true story of the original Panyee FC soccer team.   Living on a floating island with little room to even walk, a group of young boys had the creativity to find a way to play soccer.  Now the team is considered one of the best youth leagues in Southern Thailand, winning the Youth Championships 7 times in a row.

The video underlines the fact that the seemly impossible is made possible through a common goal, problem-solving, and teamwork.

5:14 View
3.1 Tuckman’s Five Stages of Team Development This video briefly describes Tuckman’s five stages of team development: forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. 1:27 View
3.1 Why Collaboration Is an Individual Effort: Emily Eldridge at TEDxMU Understanding personalities, people, and their individual needs are essential to collaboration and good teamwork. Emily Eldridge in this TEDx Talk discusses the power of the individual in a team and the four things each person needs to know about themselves and share with other team members to be an effective team member. 12:38 View

Learning Activities

The projects or assignments require learners to apply knowledge and skills related to the topic. They align with the evidence-based practices for adult learners of authentic learning, reflection, guidance, performance feedback, and follow-up activities.

 

Analysis of a Collaborative Team: This project requires that you identify and analyze a team with which you are associated. The team should be one that is intended to function as a collaborative team, even if it is not a highly functioning team at the time of your analysis. You will assess the team and provide a description of its current functioning using ECTA checklist #3 Teaming and Collaboration: Collaboration to Learn and Grow. Your assessment must include supporting evidence for each of the items, as well as a completed summary and analysis section.

Initially, a paragraph identifying the team that you will analyze, as well as a brief statement of your initial impressions of the team’s strengths and challenges must be submitted. The final products are the completed checklist with supporting evidence, a completed analysis and summary of the results, and reflection.

 

Collaborate to Develop a Plan for Activity-Based Intervention (ABI) and for Monitoring Progress:  The TEAM will assist the program staff to develop a realistic and workable plan for implementing ABI and for monitoring progress for one child within the daily activities and routines of a classroom that the student is working with for the practicum. This will involve working with the program staff to identify and prioritize functional learning objectives for the child, observing and discussing with the staff the daily routine and typical activities of the classroom, determining with the staff appropriate routines or activities in which to embed opportunities to practice the targeted skills, and planning realistic procedures for monitoring the child’s progress. The plan developed with the staff may also include curriculum modifications (e.g., modifications of the environment, materials, activity, etc.). The TEAM will provide written plans to the classroom staff that includes an individual activity matrix, strategies for teaching the targeted skills, procedures for collecting data in order to monitor progress, and any other forms or plans that were completed as part of the planning process. The TEAM should prepare a brief (two-page) reflection on this process. A suggested resource for this project is the following book: Sandall, S. R., & Schwartz, I. S. (2019). Building blocks for teaching preschoolers with special needs, (3rd ed.). Brookes.

Submit the following: (A) written plans (e.g., individual activity matrix, teaching strategies, data collection procedures, and any other forms or plans used in the process), and (B) a two-page reflection paper.

 

Collaborative Workshop Planning Teams: Many class sessions will include “collaborative workshop planning time”. Each student will be assigned to a team and assigned a workshop topic. Collaborative workshop planning teams will use the time to plan the workshop. Teams are expected to use collaborative strategies, including developing and using group norms, using agendas, keeping meeting minutes, using distributed leadership practices, documenting the results of group processing at the end of each group time, and completing a final assessment of the team’s functioning and stage of development. Weekly teamwork must be documented. The final product must include:

  • a title page with the team’s name, membership, and workshop title.
  • a list of group norms used by the team.
  • team meeting minutes with date, the primary topic of discussion, team member roles, a summary of the discussion, and summary and reflection on group processing.

 

Teaming Models – Observation and Reflection:  For your field placement, observe and reflect on the teaming model employed in this setting for assessment, individualized planning, and intervention/instruction. For each of these program activities (i.e., assessment, individualized planning, intervention/instruction), respond to the following questions:

  • What program activity is included in this section of your reflection?
  • What teaming model is used? Keep in mind that a different teaming model may be used for different program activities.
  • Who are the team members and what is each of their primary roles on the team?
  • What is your rationale for identifying the team model that you chose for this program activity?
  • If in the future you are an early intervention or teacher in this program, what would you want to maintain as part of this team and what would you want to see changed? Support your response with information from course discussions, readings, and DEC Recommended Practices.

Websites

American Occupational therapy Association https://www.aota.org

American Physical Therapy Association https://www.apta.org

American Speech and Hearing Association https://www.asha.org

Division for Early Childhood Learning Decks https://www.dec-sped.org/learning-decks

Division for Early Childhood Recommended Practices https://www.dec-sped.org/dec-recommended-practices

Council for Exceptional Children High Leverage Practices https://highleveragepractices.org/about-hlps/

ECTA Practice Improvement Tools: Topic – Teaming and Collaboration https://ectacenter.org/decrp/topic-teaming.asp

ECTA Service Delivery Approaches and Models https://ectacenter.org/topics/eiservices/approaches-models.asp

Head Start Early Learning and Knowledge Center https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/

National Association of Interpreters in Education https://naiedu.org/

National Association of School Psychologists https://www.nasponline.org

National Resource Center for Paraeducators https://nrcpara.org/

Zero to Three https://www.zerotothree.org/

Learning Modules

Modules from other sources that relate to the topic. They can be used in their entirety or by selecting sections or content that support the objectives of an IHE course or PD content. The evidence-based practices for adult learners will vary based on the module selected.

Learning Modules

CONNECT Module 3: Communication for Collaboration https://connectmodules.dec-sped.org/connect-modules/learners/module-3/

Early Childhood Recommended Practices Module 4: Teaming and Collaboration https://rpm.fpg.unc.edu/module-4-teaming

Related Services: Common Supports for Students with Disabilities https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/rs/

Working Together Series  https://www.cadreworks.org/resources/cadre-materials/working-together-series

Glossary

Term Definition Reference/Resource
Collaboration Collaboration refers to interactive relationships between adults, such as family members and professionals who work together to achieve mutually agreed-upon outcomes/goals. Division for Early Childhood. (2014). DEC recommended practices in early intervention/early childhood special education. Division for Early Childhood. https://www.dec-sped.org/dec-recommended-practices
Culturally and linguistically responsive and affirming Approaches that empower individuals intellectually, socially, emotionally, and politically by using cultural and historical referents to convey knowledge, impart skills, and change attitudes.

 Such approaches involve consciously creating social interactions to help individuals meet the criteria of academic success, cultural competence, and critical consciousness and include creating individual-centered learning environments that affirm

cultural identities; foster positive learning outcomes; develop children’s abilities to connect across lines of difference; elevate historically marginalized voices; empower children as agents of social change; and contribute to individual child engagement, learning, growth, and achievement through the cultivation of critical thinking.  These approaches challenge norms (e.g., expectations regarding language, behavior, social interactions) in order to be responsive to marginalized children and families and work towards greater equity.

http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/crs/culturally-responsive-sustaining-education-framework.pdf

DEC RP Glossary: Official DEC Recommended Practices Glossary.pdf (egnyte.com)

Barrera, I., Corso, R., & Macpherson, D. (2003). Skilled dialogue: Strategies for responding to cultural diversity in early childhood. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

Ladson-Billings, G. (2014). Culturally relevant pedagogy 2.0: Aka the remix. Harvard Educational Review, 84(1), 74-84.

Early Childhood Special Educator An educator who provides special education services for children three through eight years with developmental delays and disabilities and their families.
Early Interventionist An educator who serves in the special instruction role for Part C  working with children birth to three years with developmental delays and disabilities and their families.
Evidence-based practice Used as a Noun - Practices that are based on the best available empirical research that documents the practice’s efficacy with young children and families; the wisdom and knowledge of the field; and the core guiding values, beliefs, and theoretical approaches of EI/ECSE.

Used as a Verb – The process for selecting and implementing practices that weigh research evidence; family and professional wisdom and values; and the individual characteristics, strengths, and needs of a child.

Odom, S. L., & Wolery, M. (2003). A unified theory of practice in early intervention/early childhood special education: Evidence-based practices. The Journal of Special Education, 37(3), 164173.

Buysse, V., Wesley, P. W., Snyder, P., & Winton, P. (2006). Evidence-based practice: What does it really mean for the early childhood field? Young Exceptional Children, 9(4), 2-11.

Family A child’s consistent (i.e., primary) caregiver(s) who have responsibility for the child’s well-being and development and who are partners in the child’s education and intervention. This may include a variety of individuals, including, but not limited to, the child’s biological, adoptive, or foster parent(s), legal guardians, siblings, grandparents, other relatives, and others within the child’s primary support network. Mapp, K., & Kuttner, P. J. (2013). Partners in education: A dual capacity-building framework for family-school partnerships. Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Lab.

Turnbull, A. P., Turnbull, R., Erwin, E. J., Soodak, L. C., & Shogren, K. A. (2015). Families, professionals, and exceptionality: Positive outcomes through partnerships and trust. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Group facilitation strategies Strategies are used to ensure that everyone in the group is engaged. They include strategies for clarifying comments and issues, focusing on discussion, synthesizing differences within a context of mutual respect, identifying underlying agreements, and seeking consensus. Division for Early Childhood. (2015). DEC recommended practices glossary. Division for Early Childhood. Official DEC Recommended Practices Glossary.pdf (egnyte.com)
Interdisciplinary Team of professionals from several disciplines and family members characterized by: (a) formal channels of communication, (b) information sharing, and (c) regular meetings to discuss children’s individual plans and progress. Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.
Multidisciplinary Team of professionals from different disciplines who work independently of each other. Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.
Occupational Therapist Related service professional who helps individuals across the lifespan by adapting the environment and/or daily activities to improve fine motor and self-help skills. American Occupational Therapy Association. (n.d.). What is occupational therapy?  American Occupational therapy Association. https://www.aota.org/Conference-Events/OTMonth/what-is-OT.aspx
Paraprofessional Also referred to as a paraeducator, teacher’s aide, or instructional assistant. They may assist in providing special education and related services to children with disabilities. They are appropriately trained and supervised in accordance with state law, regulation, or written policy. IDEA, 20 U.S.C. 1412(a)14(b
Physical Therapist Related service professionals who help individuals improve or restore mobility and prevent or manage health conditions, who use interventions to help individuals move, reduce pain, restore function, prevent disability, and promote wellness and participation in life. The Role of Physical Therapy with Infants, Toddlers, and their families in Early Intervention

Early Intervention Special Interest Group Meeting (pediatricapta.org)

Related Services Professionals Professionals from different disciplines who provide support to children with disabilities, their families, and their teachers. These individuals include those who provide speech-language pathology services, physical therapy, occupational therapy, school health services, school psychology, social work, assistive technology, audiology, transportation, or other services necessary for children to grow and develop. The IRIS Center. (n.d.). Glossary. Vanderbilt University, The IRIS Center. https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/resources/glossary/
Role extension Team members engage in professional development to expand their knowledge and skills in their respective disciplines. Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.
Role enrichment Team members develop a general awareness and understanding of other disciplines through information sharing. Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.
Role expansion Team members continue to learn about other disciplines’ roles by exchanging information on making observational and programmatic judgments. Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.
Role Exchange Team members begin to incorporate in their practice and implement some of the strategies of another discipline with assistance and supervision from that discipline (e.g., an EI practitioner position a child to maximize their engagement after instruction from and observation by the PT). Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.
Role Release Team members begin to give up or “release” intervention strategies to another team member who then becomes the primary team member working with the child and family (e.g., EI, preschool teacher). Ongoing communication occurs between team members and supervision, as needed. Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.
Role Support A team member from a specific discipline periodically observes and consults with the professional responsible for delivering services to ensure that practices are being implemented correctly and to determine if changes in the intervention are needed. Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.
School Psychologist Related services professional who conducts assessments for eligibility and functional behavioral assessments and assists with developing and implementing behavioral intervention plans. The IRIS Center. (n.d.). Glossary. Vanderbilt University, The IRIS Center. https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/resources/glossary/
Social Worker Related service professional who assists families in obtaining community-based economic and social services and provides counseling based on licensure and state requirements. National Association of Social Workers
Speech-Language Pathologist Related service professionals trained to evaluate, diagnose, and treat speech, language, communication, and swallowing disorders. These highly trained clinicians work as part of a collaborative, interdisciplinary team of professionals. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association | ASHA
Strengths-based Approaches that concentrate on the inherent strengths of children and their families. It is a philosophy and a way of viewing children and their families as resourceful, resilient, and self-determined. Green, B. L., McAllister, C. L., & Tarte, J. M. (2004). The strengths-based practices inventory: A tool for measuring strengths-based service delivery in early childhood and family support programs. Families in Society, 85(3), 326-334.
Team Representatives from multiple disciplines and the family combine efforts in response to the service setting, unique needs, and desired outcomes of the child and family. Each individual on the team contributes to a clearly defined portion of the effort. Dettmer, P., Thurston, L., & Dyck, N. (2005). Consultation, collaboration, and teamwork for students with special needs (5th ed.). Pearson.
Transdisciplinary team model Team of professionals from several disciplines and family members who jointly plan and monitor the child’s individualized plan with one team member serving as the primary service provider. Central to the implementation of this model are role extension, role enrichment, role expansion, role exchange, and role release. Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.

References

Aldridge, J., Kilgo, J. L., & Bruton, A. K. (2015). Transforming transdisciplinary early intervention and early childhood special education through intercultural education.  International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education, 7(2), 343-360. https://www.int-jecse.net/data-cms/articles/20200531110233pm7208.pdf

Biggs, E. E., Gilson, C. B., & Carter, E. W. (2016). Accomplishing more together: Influences to the quality of professional relationships between special educators and paraprofessionals. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 41(4), 256-272.

Biggs, E. E., Gilson, C. B., & Carter, E. W. (2019). “Developing That Balance”: Preparing and Supporting Special Education Teachers to Work With Paraprofessionals. Teacher Education and Special Education, 42(2), 117-131.

Brown, T. L., Gatmaitan, M., & Harjusola-Webb, S. M. (2014). Using performance feedback to support paraprofessionals in inclusive preschool classrooms. Young Exceptional Children, 17(2), 21-31. https://doi.org/10.1177/1096250613493189

Division for Early Childhood (2014).  DEC recommended practices in early intervention/early childhood special education 2014.  Retrieved from http://www.dec-sped.org/recommendedpractices

Friend, M., & Barron, T. (2019). Collaborating with colleagues to increase student success. In J. McLeskey, L. Maheady, B. Billingsley,, M. Brownell, & T.J. Lewis (Eds.), High leverage practices for inclusive classrooms (pp. 3-14). New York, NY: Routledge.

King, G., Strachan, D., Tucker, M., Duwyn, B., Desserud, S., & Shillington, M. (2009). The application of a transdisciplinary model for early intervention services. Infants and Young Children, 22(3), 211-223.  https://journals.lww.com/iycjournal/Fulltext/2009/07000/The_Application_of_a_Transdisciplinary_Model_for.6.as

Rausch, A., Bold, E., & Strain, P. (2021). The more the merrier: Using collaborative transdisciplinary services to maximize inclusion and child outcomes. Young Exceptional Children, 24(2), 59-69.

Ronfeldt, M., Farmer. S., McQueen, K., & Grissom, J.A.  (2015).  Teacher collaboration in instructional teams and student achievement.  American Educational Research Journal, 52, 475-514.

Spence, C. M., Miller, D., Corr, C., Santos, R. M., & Bentley, B. (2021). When in doubt, reach out: Teaming strategies for inclusive early childhood settings. Young Children, 76(1), 39-49.

Solis, M., Vaughn, S., Swanson, E., & McCulley, L. (2012).  Collaborative models of instruction:  The empirical foundations of inclusion and co-teaching.  Psychology in the Schools, 49, 498-510.

Tremblay, P. (2013).  Comparative outcomes of two instructional models for students with Learning disabilities:  Inclusion with co-teaching and solo-taught special education. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 13, 251-258.

Woodruff, G., & McGonigel, M. J. (1988). Early intervention team approaches: The transdisciplinary model. In J. B. Jordan, J. J. Gallagher, P. L. Hutinger, & M. B. Karnes (Eds.), Early childhood special education: Birth to Three (pp. 163-181). Council for Exceptional Children and Division for Early Childhood.

Select a Category:

Blueprint

ECPC Course Enhancement Modules E-Learning Lessons, Practice Guides & Resources 
CONNECT Modules CONNECT Modules and Courses
Faculty Forum - The Chronicle of Higher Education Archived Zoom Call: Faculty Resilience and the COVID-19 - Week 2
Frank Porter Graham Toolkit of Resources TOOLKIT: resources for early childhood faculty and instructors
Association of College and University Educators Online teaching toolkit
The Chronicle of Higher Education How to be a better online teacher advice guide
SCRIPT-NC Shifting to Online Instruction and Faculty Webinars
Openstax Open access to high quality textbooks online -free
CEEDAR Center Virtual Toolkit: Easing Faculty Transition to Online Instruction​
FREE RESOURCE: Poll Everywhere for Higher Ed. Faculty Create unlimited questions for up to 40 students
CEC Webinar and Resources Teaching Special Education Online During COVID-19
IRIS Center Planning for Distance Learning: Resources: Modules, Case Study Units, Activities
The Chronicle of Higher Education, Michelle D. Miller
Going Online in a Hurry: What to Do and Where to Start
The Chronicle of Higher Education, Kevin Gannon 4 Lessons from Moving a Face-to-Face Course Online
The Chronicle of Higher Education, Heather R. Taft, March 17, 2020 How to Quickly (and Safely) Move a Lab Course Online
The Chronicle of Higher Education Coping With Coronavirus: How Faculty Members Can Support Students in Traumatic Times
The Chronicle of Higher Education, Flower Darby How to Be a Better Online Teacher (Advice Guide)
Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council Video Series: Use of Technology with Evidence Based Early Intervention
National Center on Deaf Blindness
Open Hands, Open Access video learning modules
Coursera Child Development Courses

 

Activity Bank

*New* Tip sheet: Enhancing Family-Provider Partnerships During COVID-19  Enhancing Family-Provider Partnerships
Tips for Providers: Providing & Coordinating EI Remotely Tips for Providers: What to say to Families
Tips for Providers: Providing & Coordinating EI Remotely (What will it look like?) Tips for Providers: What will a Remote Visit Look Like?
Tips for Families: Receiving Remote EI Services Tips for Families Flyer .pdf What is Remote EI

Consejos para Familias .pdf What is Remote EI? (Spanish)

Tips for Families: How to prepare for a Remote EI Visit Tips for Families: .pdf Preparing for the Visit

TConsejos para Familias: .pdf Preparing for the Visit (Spanish)

ECPC Course Enhancement Modules E-Learning Lessons, Practice Guides & Resources 
CONNECT Modules CONNECT Modules and Courses
Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center Framework for reflective questioning / The Coaching Quick Reference Guide - .pdf
Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center Tools of Trade
OCALI (Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence Disabilities) (note: you must login but it is free) Suite of Resources for Early Childhood Professionals
Public Consulting Group Use of telehealth in early intervention (IDEA Part C)
Protecting Student Privacy

U.S. Department of Education

Student Privacy 101

FERPA and the Coronavirus Disease 2019

FERPA and Virtual Learning

Edelman, L. (2020). Planning for the Use of Video Conferencing for Early Intervention Home Visits during the COVID-19 Pandemic Planning for the Use of Video Conferencing for Early Intervention Home Visits during the COVID-19 Pandemic
CEC Hosted Webinar with Resources Teaching Special Education Online During COVID-19
National Center for Hearing Assessment & Management Utah State University Welcome to the Tele-Intervention Learning Courses
Lisa Dieker & Rebecca Hines UCF - Podcasts for Part B/619 Coordinators Series of Podcasts: teaching online, inclusion, etc.
National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations - May Newsletter Pyramid in the Time of COVID-19